Glenda Henderson


Profile

Image: Glenda Henderson

About Me

Glenda Henderson has spent a lifetime surrounded by wildlife. She attended school in her little Texas community called Elwood, graduated from high school in Bonham, Texas, worked and attended business college in Dallas and later attended SMU night school. She worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company for 11 years doing clerical and secretarial work. She married in 1959 and became a housewife when her first child was born in 1963. She worked periodically as a temporary office employee, real estate secretary, and salesperson. She continued her education at UTA at Arlington. She has done much volunteer work for church, community, school, Cub Scouts, fundraisers, hospital, and caring for orphaned, injured, and ill wildlife.

She grew up on a farm admiring the wildlife and brought up her own family on six acres in Cedar Hill, a suburb of Dallas, where she and her family were entertained by their fellow creatures. She spent seven years as a wildlife rehabilitator for Texas Parks and Wildlife and knows wild animals well, the way they live, where they stay, what they eat, and how to safely handle them when they are in crisis.

These later years she has lived on a golf course in DeSoto, also a suburb of Dallas. She is blessed with many ponds and woods for observing and taking pictures.

She loves the sweet simplicity of haiku, the soothing cadence of the 5-7-5 arrangement of syllables, and the thought provoking messages they bring without using a great amount of words. She also writes short stories, poems, wildlife articles, and other forms of literature, but has enjoyed expressing her thoughts in haiku for about 15 years. She is known as Guini, a childhood nickname and the name used by her grandchildren. At the hospital where she volunteers she is known as Miss Glenda.

My spirit intact
I deal with aging body
Dim eyes can see well


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